For those that grew up in the UK in the 70s and 80s, this pudding may bring back horrible memories of school dinners. But it’s time to slay those canteen monsters and drag this pudding out of the last century and into this one.

The recipe is quick and easy, and this vegan version is so rich that you won’t believe there’s no dairy products in it.

The addition of coconut oil at the end is optional, but it adds a richness that leaves you really satisfied. It sounds odd but I recommend trying it out!

Ingredients

(serves 2 in bowls or 4 in small ramekins)

  • 500ml mylk (we used Bonsoy almond or you could make your own) or dairy milk
  • 1 tbsp cacao powder
  • 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • pinch of salt (if your milk doesn’t already contain some)
  • 60g semolina
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil

Method

  1. Add the milk, cacao powder, maple syrup to a medium saucepan and bring close to a boil.
  2. Reduce to a low heat and sprinkle in the semolina, whisking as you go to avoid lumps.
  3. Allow the semolina to thicken by leaving the pan on a low heat for a further 5 minutes, whisking occasionally.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat and stir through the coconut oil well.
  5. Serve in bowls or ramekins, topped with flaked almonds, chopped nuts or blueberry buckinis.

Pro Tips

  • If your pudding goes lumpy despite your best efforts, you can embrace the imperfect, or use a stick blender in the pan to even out the texture.
  • Start with one tablespoon of maple syrup and then stir through another later on if you’d like your pudding on the sweeter side. Or swap the syrup for a tablespoon of honey, which is a little sweeter.
  • You can even omit the cacao and banana and stir a generous blob of jam through your bowl after serving.
  • This recipe can be altered in many different ways to your taste. Choose coconut milk and top the pudding with shaved coconut milk. Or swap the cacao powder for 2 bananas – add them to the finished pudding and blend them together.
  • You can even chill the pudding and serve cold – it is reminiscent of a old-fashioned blancmange served this way.